Panel Discussion: Monsters, Myths, and the Trauma of War

March 21 · 6:00pm – 7:15pm
Free
5c7d89d842ee3 Panel Discussion: Monsters, Myths, and the Trauma of War 2019-21-03.panel.discussion.monsters.myths.and.the.trauma.of.war /images/events/large/Curator_Dr_Oliver_Shell.jpg /images/events/small/Curator_Dr_Oliver_Shell.jpg Curator Dr. Oliver Shell

Curator Dr. Oliver Shell

1 2019-03-21T18:00:00-04:00 2019-03-21T19:15:00-04:00 Free

5-6 p.m. — Free admission to Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s. Tickets regularly $15

6-7:15 p.m.  — Join Monsters & Myths Curator Dr. Oliver Shell and scholars from Johns Hopkins University, and Morgan State University for a discussion on the psychological effects of war, how Surrealists used classical mythology as a metaphor for traumatic events of the 1930s and 1940s, and the relevance of this work today. Auditorium doors open at 5:30 p.m.

No RSVP or ticket required for exhibition entry or panel discussion.

Panelists

Dr. Shane Butler is Professor of Classics at Johns Hopkins University. He received his PhD from Columbia University and has held residential fellowships at the American Academy in Rome, the Villa I Tatti in Florence, and the Getty Villa in Malibu. Dr. Butler works on Latin literature from antiquity through the Renaissance and his interests range from media history and theory to sensation, cognition, and aesthetics; rhetoric and poetics; the history of sexuality; and the history of classical scholarship. His published books include The Hand of Cicero (2002), which examines the production and circulation of Roman oratory; The Matter of the Page (2011) on the physical formats of books; Synaesthesia and the Ancient Senses (2013), co-edited with Alex Purves, which follows the connections between literature and the senses; The Ancient Phonograph (2015) on the role of the voice in the making and reading of classical literature; and Sound and the Ancient Senses (2019), co-edited with Sarah Nooter, a survey of the soundscapes of the ancient world. He is Associate Editor of the I Tatti Renaissance Library and also co-edits the Classics After Antiquity series for Cambridge University Press. Dr. Butler is working on a new book tentatively titled On the Surface: John Addington Symonds Across Space and Time.

Dr. Lori Johnson is Assistant Professor of Art History at Morgan State University. She has a doctorate in art history, criticism, and conservation from Princeton University with a specialty in modern and contemporary art. Her teaching interests are broad and include a comprehensive knowledge of not only modern European and American art, but also the history of landscape and industrial design, modern literature, critical theory, and continental philosophy. Dr. Johnson focuses her research on the relationship between discourse and cultural practice with an emphasis on how art normalizes the operations of power through the representation of class, race, gender, and sexuality. In spring 2014, she published an essay entitled, "'A Dwelling Place': Sensing the Poetics of the Everyday in the Work of Pierre Bonnard," which appeared in the critical anthology Heidegger and the Work of Art History (2014), published by Ashgate Press. Currently she is completing an essay on the African American architect Julian Abele and his designs for Duke University for an anthology entitled From Slave Gardens to Black Wall Street, being published in fall 2019 by University of North Carolina Press.

5-6 p.m. — Free admission to Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s. Tickets regularly $15

6-7:15 p.m.  — Join Monsters & Myths Curator Dr. Oliver Shell and scholars from Cornell University, Johns Hopkins University, and Morgan State University for a discussion on the psychological effects of war, how Surrealists used classical mythology as a metaphor for traumatic events of the 1930s and 1940s, and the relevance of this work today. Auditorium doors open at 5:30 p.m.

No RSVP or ticket required for exhibition entry or panel discussion.

Curator Dr. Oliver Shell

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