Current Exhibitions

Image: A BMA team installs an exterior component of A Moment’s Pleasure. See a time-lapse of this installation phase on Instagram @baltimoremuseumofart.

Mickalene Thomas: A Moment's Pleasure

Through May 2021

Mickalene Thomas’ immersive two-story installation will transform the BMA’s East Lobby into a living room for Baltimore. The experience will extend onto an enclosed terrace where the BMA will host a series of events, such as film screenings, artist talks, performances, workshops, book clubs, and self-care seminars. Influenced by the 1970s and 1980s, Thomas’ signature aesthetic incorporates geometric patterns, prints, textures, wood paneling, and shag carpeting, among other nostalgic motifs.


Image: Artists unidentified. Wedding Ensemble. 1980s. Ndebele region, South Africa. Composed with Gifts of Caroline Popper and Marie-Claude and Eric McKie, Baltimore, in Honor of Frederick Lamp, Curator, Arts of Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Oceania, 1981-2003, BMA 1991.361.1, 1999.369.2, 1991.371, 1990.195, and 2004.177

Adorned: African Women & the Art of Identity

Through June 19, 2020

Across sub-Saharan Africa, a strict gendered division of artistic labor existed throughout much of the 19th and 20th centuries. Men worked in wood and metal, carving and casting works that glorified leaders and paid homage to deities, while women created works in clay, cloth, and beads, stitching and firing the art of everyday life. This exhibition brings together two dozen works from the BMA's collection to demonstrate the critical role of women in shaping and maintaining social identities across 20th-century Africa.


Gertrud and Otto Natzler. Bowl. 1947. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Dr. and Mrs. John A. Pope, BMA 1959.78. Courtesy Gail Reynolds Natzler, Trustee the Natzler Family Trust

Free Form: 20th-Century Studio Craft

Through June 7, 2020

This exhibition presents a selection of embroidery, ceramics, and jewelry by innovative mid-century American artists who shifted away from the functional aspect of craft towards an avant-garde engagement with abstraction and expression. Objects featured include works by textile artist Mariska Karasz, a Hungarian immigrant to the U.S. who moved away from her established business as a women’s clothing designer to focus on embroidery as an artistic practice; Baltimore-area designer and embroiderer Gloria Balder Katzenberg, who was influenced by Karasz’s philosophy and produced works that evoke gardens, ponds, fireworks, or celestial scenes with unconventional materials; ceramic artists Gertrud and Otto Natzler, who fled Nazi-occupied Austria and founded their own workshop in Los Angeles, California, in 1938; and metalsmith and jewelry maker Betty Cooke, a nationally acclaimed Baltimore native and an alumnus of the Maryland Institute College of Art who began her career in the mid-1940s and is still making work today.

This exhibition is supported by Susan B. Katzenberg, in memory of Gloria Balder Katzenberg, and Carol Macht, in honor of Betty Cooke.

Additional support comes from the Jean and Allan Berman Textile Endowment Fund.

Curated by Virginia Anderson, Curator of American Art


Grace Hartigan. Red Bowl. 1953. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Herman Jervis, New York, in Memory of Dorothy B. Jervis, BMA 1986.194. © Estate of Grace Hartigan

By Their Creative Force: American Women Modernists

Through July 5, 2020

This exhibition of painting, sculpture, and decorative arts celebrates the contributions women artists have made to the development of American modernism. The show includes works by well-known artists, including Elizabeth Catlett and Georgia O'Keeffe, among others, as well as works by those who were often under-recognized, such as Maria Martinez and Marguerite Zorach. The selection of works showcases these artists’ innovative engagements with the 20th century’s major art movements, from Cubism to Abstract Expressionism. Several of these accomplished artists—including Simone Brangier Boas, Grace Hartigan, Elsa Hutzler, Helen Jacobson, Amalie Rothschild, and Grace Turnbull—were based in Baltimore during their careers.

This exhibition is generously supported by the Sigmund M. and Mary B. Hyman Fund for American Art.


Installation view, Henry Moore and the Pre-Columbian Past. Henry Moore. _The Three Rings_. 1966. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Ryda and Robert H. Levi, Baltimore, BMA 1987.225. © The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved, DACS / www.henry-moore.org

Henry Moore and The Pre-Columbian Past

Through June 28, 2020

In 1921, a young Henry Moore (British, 1898-1986) walked through the doors of the British Museum and encountered the stone carvings of ancient America for the first time. Moore was attracted to what he called the “stoniness” of the artworks, their “truth to material,” and sought to emulate this in his own work. As an art student in the early 1920s, he obsessively sketched hundreds of these works to learn how to approach three-dimensional form.

Installation View, Henry Moore and the Pre-Columbian Past. Henry Moore. _The Three Rings_. 1966. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Ryda and Robert H. Levi, Baltimore, BMA 1987.225. © The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved, DACS /www.henry-moore.org



Spencer Finch. Moon Dust (Apollo 17). 2009.

Spencer Finch: Moon Dust

Through October 14, 2024

Spencer Finch’s impressive light installation Moon Dust (Apollo 17), first presented at the 2009 Venice Biennale, will illuminate the BMA’s majestic Fox Court for the next seven years.

Moon Dust (Apollo 17) is on extended loan from the collection of Joanne Gold and Andrew Stern, who are generously sponsoring its presentation at the BMA.




Collection Galleries

An installation shot of the new American Wing.

American Art

The American Wing includes more than 800 paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts that explore the international character of American art and Baltimore's position as a major center for art production and foreign trade from the late 18th century forward.

An image of the Cone wing, with many colorful Matisse's adorning the gallery
		walls.

Cone Collection

The Cone Collection of modern art is the crown jewel of the BMA, featuring works by Matisse, Picasso, Pissarro, Courbet, and Degas.

Collected by Baltimore sisters Claribel and Etta Cone from the early-mid 20th century, the Cone Collection is one of the world’s most important art collections.

A statue of an angry camel with two humps.

Asian Art

Discover 2,000 years of innovation by Chinese artists from 2nd century BCE to today in this presentation of the Asian art collection. Two galleries feature ceramics, furniture, and painting, as well as bronze, jade, and lacquer objects that showcase the beauty and strength of Chinese art.

A gallery shot of the installation.

European Art

This installation features the monumental Rinaldo and Armida, one of the world's finest paintings by Sir Anthony van Dyck, as well as masterpieces by Frans Hals, Rembrandt van Rijn, and Jean Baptiste Siméon Chardin.

A visitor examining an African mask.

African Art

The BMA's presentation of its renowned African art collection emphasizes the relationships between 85 incredible works, many large-scale, and the lives of the people by and for whom the objects were made. Artists and diverse traditions from more than 40 African empires, kingdoms, and regions are represented.